Sloth Plush Video Tutorial Part 2 and Backpack

Part 2 of the Sloth video tutorial is finished and ready to share! I hope you are excited to complete this project!

Sloth Supplies:

  • 7 x 48 inches Faux Fur or Fleece for body and legs
  • 4.5 x 18 inches of fleece for the face and claws
  • Scrap felt for face details
  • Two 16mm Safety Eyes (You could also use felt circles or buttons if you prefer)
  • Embroidery floss
  • Magnets, Velcro, or Snaps (optional)
  • Scrap fabric to cover magnets (optional)
  • Coordinating Thread
  • Poly-fil Stuffing

Helpful Tools:

Files:

Sloth Quick Overview:

Sloth Video Detailed Instructions PART 1:

Sloth Video Detailed Instructions PART 2:

BACKPACK

When I made the sloth plush project I always intended for there to be accessories to go with it. So, here is the first!

This is a tiny little backpack that is just adorable on the sloth project!

It could easily be adapted for other dolls and stuffed animals by adjusting the elastic straps.

You can choose to make the backpack out of a single layer of fabric (like my denim example), or you can make it with lining (pink example). There are also two different options for the lower straps. Loops that go around each leg, or a single strap that goes around the belly.

Overall, I was really happy with how this one turned out. I hope you enjoy it as well!

Supplies:

  • 4.5 x 18 inches of Main Fabric
  • 4.5 x 18 inches of Interfacing (optional – I used Pellon SF101)
  • 4.5 x 18 inches of Lining Fabric (optional)
  • 1.75 x 4 inches of fabric for the trim
  • 3 inches of 1/4 inch wide ribbon (optional)
  • One 7 inch Zipper
  • 3/4 yard (27 inches) of 1/4 inch wide elastic
  • Coordinating Thread

Files:

Backpack Video Instructions:

Sloth Plush Video Tutorial PART 1

The sloth plush has been one of my posted free projects for quite some time, but I thought it was time to make a video!

I absolutely LOVE this project! It is so cuddly, which just makes me happy! It does take a bit of time, especially if you choose to work with fur, so the instructions for this project will be in two parts.

Supplies:

  • 7 x 48 inches Faux Fur or Fleece for body and legs
  • 4.5 x 18 inches of fleece for the face and claws
  • Scrap felt for face details
  • Two 16mm Safety Eyes (You could also use felt circles or buttons if you prefer)
  • Embroidery floss
  • Magnets, Velcro, or Snaps (optional)
  • Scrap fabric to cover magnets (optional)
  • Coordinating Thread
  • Poly-fil Stuffing

Helpful Tools:

Files:

Video Instructions PART 1:

Learn to Sew: Lesson 5: Felt Carrying Case

Thanks for your patience for this latest post! I am a full time teacher, and with school starting back in full swing I haven’t had as much time to devote to new posts as I would like. Don’t worry! I still plan to post new content. However, it just may not be as frequent as it was over the summer. I hope you enjoy the new projects as they come and until then check out my free projects that are already available!

This is a fun quick project that helps practice sewing straight seams. It also introduces bag making basics with boxed corners.

Lesson Category:

  • Machine Sewing – Straight Seams

Lesson Topics:

  • Essential Tools
  • Cutting Rectangles
  • Sewing Straight Seams
  • Boxing Corners

This project uses large sized felt fabric, since the pieces are larger than the standard sized felt sheets available in most stores.

Felt is a great fabric to start with for your first projects because it doesn’t fray. You don’t have to worry about raw edges and it will look nice inside and out!

The top of the bag is made with two layers of felt stitched together for added strength and to provide contrast.

It also has boxed corners. Boxed corners can be a bit of a challenge, but it adds a lot of great features to your bag.

It provides space at the bottom of the bag so it is no longer flat.

In this case it also allows the bag to stand up. Once you learn how to add boxed corners it is a great feature to add to many different types of bags and cases.

Lesson:

Learn to Sew: Lesson 3: Machine Stitching Practice

Using a sewing machine for the first time can be exciting, intimidating, and often frustrating.

With this lesson I hope to provide you with tips and instructions that will help you feel comfortable and confident as you begin to use your sewing machine.

Lesson Category:

  • Sewing Machine Basics

Lesson Topics:

  • Basic Machine Functions
    • A Brother Computerized Sewing Machine is used as the example
    • How to control the speed
    • Basic Stitches and Parts
  • Sewing Lines
  • Sewing Corners
  • Sewing Curves
  • Sewing with a Seam Allowance

It may seem strange, but the best way to start using the machine is to practice sewing on paper.

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This allows you to learn how to control your machine without having to deal with the complications that arise when using fabric and thread.

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We’ll learn how to sew corners and curves. We’ll also learn how to use a seam allowance.

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This lesson uses a Brother Computerized Sewing Machine for the example, but the principles can be applied to any machine. If you are using a different type of machine you may want to do some research or consult your manual to find your machine’s default needle position as well as how to use the seam allowance measurement guides so you can accurately read your needle plate.

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Stitching Practice Sheets:

Stitching Lines Practice by learncreatesew

Stitching Corners Practice by learncreatesew

Stitching Curves Practice by learncreatesew

Seam Allowance Practice by learncreatesew

Here is a Seam Allowance Measurement Guide for Brother Computerized Machines:

Brother Computerized Seam Allowance Guide by learncreatesew

Brother Computerized Seam Allowance Guide by learncreatesew.pdf

LESSON:

Learn to Sew Lesson 2: Rice Bags

The second Learn to Sew lesson continues to focus on hand-sewing. Most of the time when we are hand sewing we are not working with felt or yarn. As a result, it is very helpful to practice your stitch size and placement, as well as working with regular all-purpose thread.

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Recommended prep before this lesson:

Lesson Category:

  • Hand Stitching

Lesson Topics:

  • Careful Cutting
  • Identifying the Right Side of the Fabric
  • Using a Seam Allowance
  • Double Threading a Needle
  • Tying a knot
  • Sewing a Back Stitch
  • Blanket Stitch Applique
  • Stitch Size & Placement
  • Slip Stitch

Whether you have been sewing for a while or are picking up a needle and thread for the first time, rice bags are always a fun project πŸ™‚

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For this project, you get to add decoration of your choice to really personalize your project! Decorative stitching can add dimension to any project and is a great skill to have even when sewing complex projects. These also make great gifts when you are finished.

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Supplies:

5.5 x 11 inches of Cotton Fabric

Scrap Felt

1 Cup of Rice

Coordinating All-Purpose Thread

Here is the free pattern:

Owl and Sloth Rice Bag Patterns by learncreatesew

LESSON:

Flat Zipper Pouch

This is a classic zipper pouch! It is a great project to start sewing zippers if you want to learn.Β These make great pencil bags. They are also fun to fill and give as gifts.

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This is also a fun project to use decorative stitching on. I love adding a cute stitch to the contrasting bottom panel.

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This is a flat pouch, kind of like a pencil pouch. So, it does not stand up on its own.

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That said, it still holds quite a bit!

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You can easily adjust the size of the rectangles to make the bag as bid or small as you would like.

The bag I made has final dimensions of approximately 6 x 9 inches.

Supplies

Two 7 x 10 inch rectangles for the lining fabric

Two 7 x 10 inch rectangles of lightweight fusible interfacing (optional)

Two 4.5 x 10 inch rectangles for the outside TOP fabric

Two 3.5 x 10 inch rectangles for the outside BOTTOM fabric

One 11 inch Zipper

Here is the free pattern if you would like it.

Flat Zipper Pouch Pattern by learncreatesew

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW:

Fun Size Backpack

I absolutely LOVE this backpack! This is my favorite size backpack to take to amusement parks. At 9 x 11 inches it is smaller than regular sized backpacks, but large enough to hold a lot. I’ve stuffed this thing with water bottle, snacks, extra sweatshirt, wallet, keys, notebook, first aid kit, and more. However, it’s not so big that it gets too heavy, as regular sized backpacks can.

It even fits in a lot of the ride compartments at Disneyland. That is it’s best feature in my book!

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It is constructed with a layer of cotton overlaying duck canvas. I used bias tape to bind the seams.

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I’ve made six or seven of these bags using a variety of fabrics and interfacing. I’ve used vinyl, suede, plain canvas, fusible fleece, and even satin. The cotton covered canvas, with woven interfacing is my favorite combination! It is nice to work with, strong without being bulky, and holds its shape very well.

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I love the pocket in front. While it takes patience to construct it’s not too difficult once you know the method.

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This bag also has adjustable straps depending on how you like to wear your backpack.

Supplies Needed:

1/2 yd 41” wide Main Cotton Fabric
42 inches 19” wide Interfacing (I used Pellon SF101)
3/8 yd 58” wide Canvas (I used duck canvas from JoAnn)
One 20 inch zipper
One 13 inch zipper

1 pkg Extra Wide Double Fold Bias Tape
75 inches 1” wide Strapping
Two 1” wide Rectangle Rings
Two 1” wide Tri-glide adjusters
One “Handmade” Metal Tag (Optional)

This project takes a bit of time and patience when working with multiple pieces, zippers, curves, and interfacings. Difficulty 7/10.

Approximate Finished Dimensions (inches):

Main Compartment 9 x 3.75 x 11, Pocket 7 x 1.5 x 5.75

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS: PART 1: Fabric, Zippers, Pocket

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS: Part 2: COMING SOON!

Free Pattern:

Please note, this pattern has been updated. There was an error in the first version of the pattern, the bottom pocket gusset piece should measure 12.75 inches in length. Sorry for the inconvenience!

Scrunchies with Removable Ties

One of the projects that my students request to make most frequently is scrunchies! They are quick, easy, and don’t take a lot of fabric.

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You can use a variety of fabrics to make scrunchies, so it’s a great way to use the fabric in your scrap bin. Scrunchies are great in cotton, flannel, velvet, satin, and more.

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You can mix and match removable ties to add a bit of flare to your scrunchies.

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Scrunchies only take a few minutes to make and even beginning sewers can be successful with this project.

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You can make the scrunchies without the ties if you prefer.

Here is the pattern for the removable ties!

Scrunchie Tie Pattern by learncreatesew

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW:

Rag Doll Part 2 – Adding the Hair

Here is the second installment of my rag doll tutorial. This was by far one of the most difficult videos I have made. Not because the process is hard, but because there are so many different styles of hair that can be selected and so many methods with which it can be applied.

I spent a lot of time deciding what I would share because I didn’t want anyone to feel limited in the approach they had to use. Not to mention, there was a whole lot of yarn that did not want to cooperate and stay in place while filming! Apparently it does not take direction well.

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I really enjoyed using multi-colored hair on this doll. Mixing and matching colors strand by strand was a lot of fun, and I really like the look it created.

On the above doll the majority if her hair is the dark purple color. The wefts added at the bottom were all the same color, however at the top, I added just a bit of contrast.

I hope that you can take the methods used in this video and expand upon them to make something all your own πŸ™‚

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I love the drastically different looks you can create by altering hair styles and color.

Here is my rag doll pattern in case you missed it in the last post. The doll is just over 14 inches tall when completed.

Rag Doll Pattern by learncreatesew

ADDING THE HAIR DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

Rag Doll Part 1 – Constructing the Body

I have finished my rag doll pattern! I’ve been working hard to create the instructional videos and I am happy to say that I have the body instructions ready to share with you today.

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I really enjoyed working on this project and mixing and matching fabrics to create the body of the doll.

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I love all of the different styles you can design to make the doll uniquely your own!

This project is a bit more time consuming than others and does require a bit of patience. It is probably a 5/10 in difficulty just for the amount of time needed to hand stitch the hair and for the exactness of seam allowance that is needed. When sewing plush projects, a small error in your seam allowance can make a big difference in the appearance of your doll. You also need to be comfortable slip stitching and working with small curves.

The doll measures between 14 and 14.5 inches tall when finished.

Rag Doll Pattern by learncreatesew

Rag Doll Hair Tutorial COMING SOON!