Water Bottle Holder

The supplies for making a water bottle holder have been sitting in my closet for quite a while, and I was excited to finally use them!

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I was walking through the Dollar Tree and found this super cute water bottle and thought it was just perfect for the water bottle holder that I wanted to make.

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This water bottle has an optional drawstring at the top. The pattern is adjustable and can work for water bottles of various sizes. The pattern has templates and measurements calculated for water bottles with diameters from 2.5 – 3.125 inches. You can also adjust the height and the handle length as you like.

So, whether you are using a disposable water bottle or one that is more durable, this pattern can work for you.

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I have been using this water bottle holder for a week now and I have to say that I LOVE IT! I have started carrying it around with me and have found it super handy 🙂

Supplies:

Exterior Cotton Fabric (1/3 yard should be enough for holders up to 9 inches tall)

Lining Cotton Fabric (1/3 yard should be enough for holders up to 9 inches tall)

Rattail Cord (Optional – Approximately 1/2 yard)

Spring Cord Stopper (Optional)

Here is the free pattern:

Water Bottle Holder Pattern by learncreatesew

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

Blanket Stitch vs Buttonhole Stitch

Yesterday I was working on a project that I had hoped to have ready for you today. The project involved a lot of blanket stitching, and as I was in the middle of sewing it I realized that without noticing I would randomly switch how I made the stitch.

It got me thinking…what stitch am I actually sewing? This led me to do some research. Come to find out, the blanket stitch is often confused with the buttonhole stitch. I practiced both for quite a while and as I did so I found a stitching method that worked great for me for both stitches, and allowed me to distinguish between the two.

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I realized after doing this that I had actually been using the blanket stitch the whole time, I would just every once in a while switch to making the stitch backwards. This wouldn’t have been a big deal if I always did it that way, but going back and forth isn’t the best method. So, I made a consistent routine that helped me keep my stitches uniform. Since this helped me with my sewing project, I thought it may also be helpful to others, and decided to share it with you today.

The Blanket Stitch

The Blanket Stitch is often used for decorative edging, embroidery, and in felt crafts. You can sew the blanket stitch on the edge of fabric for decoration or to join to layers together.

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It’s a little tricky at the corners, but not too bad once you know the process.

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I most frequently use the blanket stitch for applique. This is when you sew one piece of fabric on top of another, usually for decoration.

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The video will explain how to change your thread if you happen to run out or want a different color.

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To help me remember the correct way to stitch a Blanket Stitch I think of this…

FRONT to BACK…UP and OVER.

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The Buttonhole Stitch

The buttonhole stitch is stronger than the blanket stitch. While the blanket stitch hooks over the next stitch, the buttonhole stitch actually wraps around it.

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This stitch is not as commonly used, but you do see it in embroidery, as well as actually constructing buttonholes. When making the buttonholes, you don’t leave space between the stitches. You stitch them side by side. This creates a really strong edge with all of the “knots” right next to each other.

To remember how to sew the Buttonhole Stitch I think of this…

BACK to FRONT…AROUND and DOWN.

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I hope you find this information as helpful as I did! Happy Sewing!

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW: Blanket Stitch vs. Buttonhole Stitch

Sewing Skill Builder: Slip Stitch

I am happy to share with you today my first Sewing Skill Builder video. There are a lot of essential skills in sewing that if mastered, make your projects beautiful and professional looking. However, when those same skills remain a mystery sewing can become a challenge and at times frustrating. In this series I hope share with you essential skills that you can use and build upon as you make projects in the future!

The slip stitch is also often referred to as a ladder stitch or invisible stitch.

The slip stitch is used to close pillows, linings, stuffed animals, and more.

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The slip stitch comes up again and again in sewing regardless if you are making bags, plush toys or garments. Being handy with a slip stitch is extremely useful.

When you slip stitch you are usually joining or closing two folds.

We make our stitches parallel to the folds, essentially hiding the thread inside.

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Your stitches often begin to look like the rungs of a ladder, hence the name.

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Once you pull the thread, the layers will join making the stitching invisible.

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It helps when slip stitching if you use a thin sharp needle. I also like to double thread my needle so I don’t have to worry about it sliding off.

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DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

Dish Towel Apron

A special thank you to my Aunt for giving me the idea for today’s project! This is a cute little apron made from a dish towel. It’s pretty fast to make and doesn’t take a lot of fabric. It is a good way to practice sewing pleats and pockets.

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It works best to have a dish towel with a general pattern design, rather than something that is directional, as the towel will be arranged horizontally along the waistband.

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The width of the hand towel is adjusted using pleats to give the apron a skirt like feel.

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It also has a good sized pocket that fits a cell phone and more.

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This project was a lot of fun to make! It’s also pretty simple compared to many aprons. The only difficulty really lies in working with the terry cloth itself. I would rank this project a 3/10 for difficulty.

Supplies

1/3 yard cotton fabric (Fabric may shrink in the wash. I like to purchase a few extra inches just in case.)

1 dish towel

1/4 yard lace trim (optional)

1/2 – 1 yard fusible interfacing (optional)

Coordinating Thread

Here is the cut layout if you need it.

Dish Towel Apron Cut Layouts by learncreatesew

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW:

Flat Zipper Pouch

This is a classic zipper pouch! It is a great project to start sewing zippers if you want to learn. These make great pencil bags. They are also fun to fill and give as gifts.

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This is also a fun project to use decorative stitching on. I love adding a cute stitch to the contrasting bottom panel.

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This is a flat pouch, kind of like a pencil pouch. So, it does not stand up on its own.

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That said, it still holds quite a bit!

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You can easily adjust the size of the rectangles to make the bag as bid or small as you would like.

The bag I made has final dimensions of approximately 6 x 9 inches.

Supplies

Two 7 x 10 inch rectangles for the lining fabric

Two 7 x 10 inch rectangles of lightweight fusible interfacing (optional)

Two 4.5 x 10 inch rectangles for the outside TOP fabric

Two 3.5 x 10 inch rectangles for the outside BOTTOM fabric

One 11 inch Zipper

Here is the free pattern if you would like it.

Flat Zipper Pouch Pattern by learncreatesew

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW:

Super Simple Tote Bag

This project is quick and easy, a simple tote bag that is a great project for new sewers. It is also really nice for gifts!

This bag is back to basics with a simple lining and fabric handle.

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This project doesn’t take long to make and can be easily adjusted for other sizes.

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The corners of the bag are boxed to provide space at the bottom, but it can also be made flat.

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This project is super simple and is a 1/10 in difficulty.

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW:

Scrunchies with Removable Ties

One of the projects that my students request to make most frequently is scrunchies! They are quick, easy, and don’t take a lot of fabric.

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You can use a variety of fabrics to make scrunchies, so it’s a great way to use the fabric in your scrap bin. Scrunchies are great in cotton, flannel, velvet, satin, and more.

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You can mix and match removable ties to add a bit of flare to your scrunchies.

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Scrunchies only take a few minutes to make and even beginning sewers can be successful with this project.

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You can make the scrunchies without the ties if you prefer.

Here is the pattern for the removable ties!

Scrunchie Tie Pattern by learncreatesew

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW:

Disposable Blue Shop Towel Face Masks

I was doing some research into how materials filter particles and found that Shop Towels, filter particles better than a lot of fabrics and interfacing.

As a result, I decided to make a quick face mask using blue shop towels. If the supplies are available near you they are quick, easy, and affordable. I was able to purchase enough supplies for four dozen masks for just $6!

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Please keep in mind that these products were not designed for use in face masks. It is always a good idea to check with the manufacturer to make sure it is safe to breathe through. While these masks work great for me, it is always a good idea to test your mask for breath-ability and make sure you can breathe freely while wearing it.

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This mask also has a channel for wire to create an arched bridge for the nose. This creates a great shape and a helps personalize the fit just for you. I used pipe cleaners to help shape my mask. Take care and stay safe, as there is always a potential hazard when placing wire next to your face and eyes.

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Since these products have not been approved by the manufacturers for use in face masks, these masks are not recommended for children. But if you are looking for a quick, cheap way to make disposable masks for yourself, this is a great option!

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

Rag Doll Part 2 – Adding the Hair

Here is the second installment of my rag doll tutorial. This was by far one of the most difficult videos I have made. Not because the process is hard, but because there are so many different styles of hair that can be selected and so many methods with which it can be applied.

I spent a lot of time deciding what I would share because I didn’t want anyone to feel limited in the approach they had to use. Not to mention, there was a whole lot of yarn that did not want to cooperate and stay in place while filming! Apparently it does not take direction well.

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I really enjoyed using multi-colored hair on this doll. Mixing and matching colors strand by strand was a lot of fun, and I really like the look it created.

On the above doll the majority if her hair is the dark purple color. The wefts added at the bottom were all the same color, however at the top, I added just a bit of contrast.

I hope that you can take the methods used in this video and expand upon them to make something all your own 🙂

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I love the drastically different looks you can create by altering hair styles and color.

Here is my rag doll pattern in case you missed it in the last post. The doll is just over 14 inches tall when completed.

Rag Doll Pattern by learncreatesew

ADDING THE HAIR DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

Face Mask Key Chain Case

Once I started making tons of face masks I decided it would be nice to have something to carry them in.

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They also make great gifts if you are planning to give face masks to others!

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This case is super cute and small enough to fit on a key chain.

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I made two different versions, one lined and one without lining.

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I also used several different closures – velcro, snaps, key rings, swivel hooks, and D-rings.

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I hope you have as much fun making these as I did.

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Face Mask Key Chain Pouch Web Pattern by Learncreatesew

DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS:

QUICK OVERVIEW (LINED/FINISHED EDGE):

QUICK OVERVIEW (BASIC/UNLINED):